Reanimation of MacBook Air

For some months our MacBook Air was broken. Finally good time to replace, I thought. On the other side, the old notebook was quite useful even 6 years after purchasing. Coding on the road, web surfing, SVG/PDF presentations and so on worked fine on the Core2Duo device from 2008. The first breaking symptoms started with video errors on a DVI connected WUXGA/HDTV+ sized display. The error looked like non stable frequency handling, with the upper scan lines being visually ok and the lower end wobbling to the right. A black desktop background with a small sized window was sometimes a workaround. This notebook type uses a Nvidia 9400M on the logic board. Another non portable computer of mine which uses Nvidia 9300 Go on board graphics runs without such issues. So I expected no reason to worry about the type of graphics chip. Later on, the notebook stopped completely, even without attached external display. It showed a well known one beep every 5 seconds during startup. On MacBook Pro/Air’s this symptom means usually broken RAM.

The RAM is soldered directly on the logic board. Replacing @ Apple appeared prohibitive. Now that I began to look around to sell the broken hardware to hobbyists, I found an article talking about these early MacBook Air’s. This specific one is a 2.1 rev A 2.13 GHz. It was mentioned, that early devices suffered from lead-free soldering, which performs somewhat worse in regards to ductility than normal soldering. The result was that many of these devices suffered from electrical disconnections of its circuitry during the course of warming and cooling and the related thermal expansion and contraction. The device showed the one beep symptom on startup without booting. An engineer from Apple was unofficially cited to suggest, that putting the logic board in around 100° Celsius for a few minutes would eventually suffice to solve the issue. That sounded worth a try to me. As I love to open up many devices to look into and eventually repair them, taking my time for dismounting the logic board and not bringing it to a repair service was fine for me. But be warned, doing so can be difficult for beginners. I placed the board on some wool in the oven @120 ° and after 10 minutes and some more for montage, the laptop started again to work. I am not sure if soldering is really solved now or if the experienced symptoms will come back. I guess that some memory chips on the board were resetted and stopped telling that RAM is broken. So my device works again and will keep us happy for a while – I hope.