Web Open Font Format (WOFF) for Web Documents

The Web Open Font Format (short WOFF; here using Aladin font) is several years old. Still it took some time to get to a point, where WOFF is almost painless to use on the linux desktop. WOFF is based on OpenType style fonts and is in some way similar to the more known True Type Font (.ttf). TTF fonts are widely known and used on the Windows platform. Those feature rich kind of fonts are used for high quality font displaying for the system and local office-and design documents. WOFF aims at closing the gap towards making those features available on the web. With these fonts it becomes possible to show nice looking fonts on paper and web presentations in almost the same way. In order to make WOFF a success, several open source projects joined forces, among them Pango and Qt, and contributed to harfbuzz, a OpenType text shaping engine. Firefox and other web engines can handle WOFF inside SVG web graphics and HTML web documents using harfbuzz. Inkscape uses at least since version 0.91.1 harfbuzz too for text inside SVG web graphics. As Inkscape is able to produce PDF’s, designing for both the web and print world at the same time becomes easier on Linux.

Where to find and get WOFF fonts?
Open Font Library and Google host huge font collections . And there are more out on the web.

How to install WOFF?
For using inside inkscape one needs to install the fonts locally. Just copy the fonts to your personal ~/.fonts/ path and run

fc-cache -f -v

After that procedure the fonts are visible inside a newly started Inkscape.

How to deploy SVG and WOFF on the Web?
Thankfully WOFF in SVG documents is similar to HTML documents. However simply uploading a Inkscape SVG to the web as is will not be enough to show WOFF fonts. While viewing the document locally is fine, Firefox and friends need to find those fonts independent of the localy installed fonts. Right now you need to manually edit your Inkscape SVG to point to the online location of your fonts . For that open the SVG file in a text editor and place a CSS font-face reference right after the <svg> element like:

</svg>
<style type=”text/css”>
@font-face {
font-family: “Aladin”;
src: url(“fonts/Aladin-Regular.woff”) format(“woff”);
}
</style>

How to print a Inkscape SVG document containing WOFF?
Just convert to PDF from Inkscape’s file menue. Inkscape takes care for embedding the needed fonts and creates a portable PDF.

In case your prefered software is not yet WOFF ready, try the woff2otf python script for converting to the old TTF format.

Hope this small post gets some of you on the font fun path.

Linux Color Management Hackfest Brno 2012 ended

Around a dozen people met inside the Red Hat offices in Brno last weekend. The attendees came from various distributions and projects to discuss and work on color management for Linux. Most people arrived at Thursday and we started immediately to brain storm ideas and share information.

I was quite shocked as I heard Dantii could not join us. Fortunately the last messages about him sound very encouraging. It is great that our community could in different ways help him and his family.

The basic concept we worked with during the hackfest, was the opt-out of colour management approach. That was visible in printing and in window manager colour management.

Printing people discussed the PDF/X OutputIntent. The concept was developed to overcome the current short commings in the cupsICCprofile, which is primarily a vendor solution for CUPS print servers and the colord user session hook inside CUPS server. The implementation of the concept was done inside libCmpx, which is basically a wrapper around Ghostscript, which does the majority of the work, and a interface to Oyranos. From the other side John Layt looked into that work and Krita new print colour management tab to understand the implications for the KDE/Qt print dialog. He discussed lively with Till Kamppeter, Richard Hughes, Chris Murphy and me on how to get forward with that. Richard wrote a proof of concept for on screen print simulation in GTK. Chris talked a lot about osX printing and did some testing there. His experience on other platforms than Linux helped us a lot to figure out, which path we want to go and way the make sense. I searched for some PDF’s showing the features we need. They can now be found on ColourWiki. Jaroslav Reznik printed them and Till tested them. Michael Vrhel from the Ghostscript project fixed already after the event all of the bugs, which Till worked on in Brno. We had the idea, that some PDF printers might be able to do the right thing with the OutputIntent themselves. While discussing on how to know about that capability, Till and Richard had a nice idea how to reduce code duplication inside the current set of Linux CUPS filters. In parts the Color Management Hackfest crossed over into a Printing Summit.

Jan Grulich started coding on KolorManager. He implemented a widget to show a 2D graph of a ICC profile inside the information tab. Sirko Kemter was not very happy about the colours inside the graph. So I adjusted them, but after the hackfest.

While working on that, Jan profiled his monitor using Dantii’s colord-kde. Yes, Lukáš Tinkl fixed it, so it can now create ICC profiles. We needed to hand massage the profile to get it into Taxi DB, and then thought, it would be good to download the fresh profile later through Oyranos. That worked fine on the command line. But inside KolorManager a selection that a profile is available for download from Taxi DB would be more appealing. Jan wanted to look into that, and I worked later on a API and code snippet for Oyranos.

By the way, the above screen shot is done using the new colour correction feature for KDE-4.10. You might see the strong colour cast in it. Dan Vrátil worked on undoing that cast inside KSnapshot using the actual monitor profile. The initial coding was fast. But he likes to get that working for multiple outputs too.

Casian Andrei, who did the KWin Color Correction project during this years GSoC, wrote some documentation about that newly added feature. While writing that and clarifying some points, we discussed the opt-out inside KWin and found that it is not yet present. Sig. But Casian had played with the idea already and said that per region opt-out would be trivial inside KWin and started to write on that feature during Sunday. In case that works out, it would be trivial to opt out inside existing applications. But we found as well, that for a perfect results only a blending in the correct colour space is needed during compositing. That can be implemented inside toolkits, which is not trivial, and can then be used together with the per window opt-out. That buys us some valuable time for the toolkits to become ready for full colour management support. Whether the same per region approach is easy enough to implement in Wayland needs to be seen.

Now back to profile distribution. Oyranos obtained a new backup tool for Taxi DB. And we counted already over 200 different ICC profiles in the online data base. Sirko Kemter and Daniel Jahre grabbed the taxi sources, installed MongoDB and worked on mostly basic stuff to add later more features. The online front end to the DB can be used on every platform for download and upload. Daniel and Sirko discussed how to temporarily store a ICC profile from the ColorHug LiveCD. We found that the data base can be used for very different things, e.g. distribution of spectral data sets for camera sensors.

Pippin worked since some time on improving the display of gradients on 8-bit driven monitors. He came up with a dithering approach and tested that using the Taxi DB profiles for the analysis of his implementation. That helped him to make the algorithm more robust even with strongly distorted monitor gamma curves. There is quite some interest inside the graphics designers community for his work to solve banding problems. We talked a bit about gegl and I found babl especially interesting. The small library does, what I call pixel layout conversions. Those are in part colour space conversions and encoding conversions. For better separating encoding, 8-bit versus 16-bit etc., from colour spaces, e.g. linear gamma + Rec709 primaries versus sRGB etc., we need better ICC profile analysis. Especially gamma analysis can be improved inside rendering pipelines. Beside discussing hardware stuff, spectral imaging, video processing and so on, he gave a small and very helpful introduction into colour theory, which was a eye opener for many of the colour management newcomers and thus very welcome.

We had a interesting discussion about financial implications of colour measurement hardware. My impression is the high costs and thus reduced availability for good colour measurement gear nags on the success and acceptance of ICC colour management in consumer and professional markets.

During the hackfest it was really a pleasure to have so many experts in the field in one room and work together in a highly productive atmosphere. Some of them I met the first time. So let me thank our sponsors Google, Red Hat and KDE for their generous support of the hackfest idea.

We all worked quite a lot and found such a event should not stay single. So we agreed already to arrange a one day track and one following day at LGM in Madrid / Spain 2013 under the OpenICC umbrella. I hope we will see then even more projects coming.

Linux Color Management Hackfest 2012

The hackfest in Brno is approaching fast. I wrote earlier this year about the idea. It will happen from 9th until 12th November 2012 inside the Red Hat Czech office. Talks with our local organiser and various sponsors went good so far. People will code in Brno on various topics around color management in Linux.

The main focus looks like to be at applications, desktop and library integration. For the printing system and Taxi DB was good interest too. As the event is organised as a framework for attendees, each one will decide, what is best to do. After a morning meeting, where we can coordinate, we will likely split in smaller groups according to a choosen topic or move around as needed. We hope that works for all attendees. There are specialists present for many Linux color topics for discussion and of course color management newbies can ask them to effectively improve their project.

OpenICC Google Summer of Code 2012 results

Google Summer of Code

Participation of the OpenICC group in the Google Summer of Code 2012 program was this year a great success. All projects reached their respective goals. Here a small summary:

Colour Management for Krita Printing
Joseph Simon worked on adaption and integration of his last years implementation for colour managed printing into Krita/Linux. The workflow is based on ICC profile injection into PDF through the means of a OutputIntent.

KWin Colour Correction
Casian Andrei’s KWin changes for ICC style colour correction in the GPU are reviewed upstream and his new code to the KolorManager code base waits just for approval. The concept follows the X Color Management spec. In contrast to the elder CompICC implementation is the KWin result highly modular and thus very flexible.

Simple Toolkit Abstraction
Nitin Chadas SimpleUI project for rendering a subset of XForms was written from
ground up and provides now backends for FLTK, Gtk and Qt. It needs a bit
of polishing to become useable.

Thanks to Google for providing the colour management and graphics community again a great chance to code and learn the open source way.

OpenICC Google Summer of Code 2012 projects

OpenICC obtained three project slots for the Google Summer of Code 2012
stipends. That means three students can work again this year full time over
three summer months on colour management projects. Thanks to Google for
organising and sponsoring the program.

Here are in short the projects:

Joseph Simon will continue to work on PDF colour management for the
KDE/Linux printing stack. To have a real world project he choose to implement
Colour Management for Krita Printing.

Casian Andrej will work on ICC KWin colour correction using the X Color
Management spec. That way KWin gets a clear path toward consistent colour
output on the desktop.

Nitin Chada will work on different toolkit dependent renderers for a
XForms subset inside the Simple Toolkit Abstraction project. That standalone project shall enable modules to present
options inside dialogs or embedded in host applications.

Lets have a successful coding summer and deserve the trust Google putted in
the OpenICC organisation and with that in the participating students.

PDFassociation conference in Basel/Switzerland

PDF Association - The future of PDF

The PDF Technical Conference was organised by the independent PDFassociation and held this week March 27-28, 2012 in Basel, Switzerland in the rooms of Adobe. PDF experts from around the world meet there to talk about hot new stuff and to discuss technical details in a friendly atmosphere. In the following text I will highlight some of the talks.

Andreas Kraushaar from Fogra gave a talk about spectral imaging and why it is a good thing to support that inside PDF spot colours for packaging. Most of the time the number and kind of inks used for packaging is rapidly changing. So colour profiling the ICC way means a waste of too many time and material as it is not flexible enough for that. Embedded spectral data based recipes for rendering spot colours in supporting applications can improve speed and handling considerably.

Two talks elaborated on transparency in PDF. I found it amusing that the concept of a blending colour space is as well in the PDF community still a hot topic. But of course rendering to offscreen bitmaps instead of traditionally one final output buffer is quite different and developers agreed to find implementation sometimes not easy. And yes, there are many PDF viewers around, which blend Cmyk and RgbA together in one go ignoring any blending space requirement.

Florian Süßl from zipcon presented the well known ECI Altona Test Suite 2 now covering PDF/X-4 including transparencies. He elaborated on the work involved on how to create all the tests following the PDF-1.7 spec. He gave some examples where the various PDF renderers failed certain test. This is again a very valuable tool for developers of PDF software. It would be cool if such a test suite becomes part of the specification itself as is usual with other standards to help verifying implementations.

Following the topic of quality testing, David van Driessche explained the GWG test suite. I would find it really cool to embed GWG tests into a dedicated PDF document page for checking reproduction capabilities by layout applications like Scribus. That feature would be helpful for critical viewing and to easily test proofing software.

Bill McCoy from idpf presented a comparison of PDF and the HTML5/ePUB publication format. The later one is based on W3C standards like SVG and TTS with few modifications and has together with these a great potential depending on the involved people and organisations to further develop these technologies. ePUB was created to provide a independent platform for electronic publishers. And as the ePUB format comes out of open source technologies, it can as well be supported in the open source world by e.g. Mozilla and
Calibre logo.png.

The conference was beside sometimes very full rooms a well organised and interesting event.